October 29, 2011
Cerberus, 2009  12.5cm x 21cm acrylic on posterboard

Cerberus, 2009  12.5cm x 21cm acrylic on posterboard

August 2, 2011
The Psychopomp, 2009 48cm x 31.5cm acrylic and charcoal on 65lb paper

Rabbit is an Earth symbol, by virtue of the fact that he is so  close to the ground, and lives partially in the ground itself. He could  convey, symbolically, a need to center oneself more, for instance. He  could also imply stodginess, for that matter, a sort of “stuck in the  rut” kind of energy that happens to us all at times.
Rabbit is also a symbol of the archetypal “Trickster” in world mythologies.

The Psychopomp, 2009 48cm x 31.5cm acrylic and charcoal on 65lb paper

Rabbit is an Earth symbol, by virtue of the fact that he is so close to the ground, and lives partially in the ground itself. He could convey, symbolically, a need to center oneself more, for instance. He could also imply stodginess, for that matter, a sort of “stuck in the rut” kind of energy that happens to us all at times.

Rabbit is also a symbol of the archetypal “Trickster” in world mythologies.

July 12, 2011
Nine Branded Armadillo, 2009  12.5cm x 21cm acrylic on paperboard

Nine Branded Armadillo, 2009  12.5cm x 21cm acrylic on paperboard


June 24, 2011
Smothered Hope, 2009 acrylic and charcoal on 101cm x 61cm 75lb paper

Smothered Hope, 2009 acrylic and charcoal on 101cm x 61cm 75lb paper

June 23, 2011
Brushes MMVI-MIX, 2009 acrylic and charcoal on 31.5cm x 48cm 65lb paper
I don’t maintain my brushes very well and I keep them for far too long. Yet it is difficult for me to replace them. One, them shits are expensive. Two, a strong attachment builds over the course of my relationship with them. As I leave the brushes soaking in water, because I just need to run out to buy tortillas and that trip turns into a twelve hour meandering digression, the bristles slowly disintegrate and loose their form. Many times, through my neglect and general manhandling, these custom brushes force me to develop new techniques or allow me to create new textural strokes.After this memorial piece I tossed this batch of brushes*. Thanks for everything 2006-2009 brushes.
*I actually kept four of them.

Brushes MMVI-MIX, 2009 acrylic and charcoal on 31.5cm x 48cm 65lb paper

I don’t maintain my brushes very well and I keep them for far too long. Yet it is difficult for me to replace them. One, them shits are expensive. Two, a strong attachment builds over the course of my relationship with them. As I leave the brushes soaking in water, because I just need to run out to buy tortillas and that trip turns into a twelve hour meandering digression, the bristles slowly disintegrate and loose their form. Many times, through my neglect and general manhandling, these custom brushes force me to develop new techniques or allow me to create new textural strokes.After this memorial piece I tossed this batch of brushes*. Thanks for everything 2006-2009 brushes.

*I actually kept four of them.

June 22, 2011
Leda with Swan Approaching, 2009 60.5cm x 121cm acrylic on canvas
I have a particular interest in the time and events that precede “important” moments. Such as the processes that lead up to a chemical reaction, the five shots taken just before a Pulitzer Prize winning photograph, or what someone was doing right before an earthquake hit. So in allegorical paintings, especially ones which have been repeated throughout time, my approach is to address these spaces prior to the event. In musical terms, the rest before the note. In Leda with Swan Approaching Leda sits doodling a pentagram, symbolic for conjuring, while the swan wildly approaches. At Leda’s side is a dead rat and and a facis (bundle of sticks). These two elements are editorial symbolism saying “there’s something that stinks about this story and it has the odorous quality of fascism.”   For those still unfamiliar with the story of Leda and the Swan, I came across this recounting of the story written by someone who is as equally nonplussed by this bizarre tale as I am and they also included several images from art history so,  two birds one stone.

Leda with Swan Approaching, 2009 60.5cm x 121cm acrylic on canvas

I have a particular interest in the time and events that precede “important” moments. Such as the processes that lead up to a chemical reaction, the five shots taken just before a Pulitzer Prize winning photograph, or what someone was doing right before an earthquake hit. So in allegorical paintings, especially ones which have been repeated throughout time, my approach is to address these spaces prior to the event. In musical terms, the rest before the note. In Leda with Swan Approaching Leda sits doodling a pentagram, symbolic for conjuring, while the swan wildly approaches. At Leda’s side is a dead rat and and a facis (bundle of sticks). These two elements are editorial symbolism saying “there’s something that stinks about this story and it has the odorous quality of fascism.”   For those still unfamiliar with the story of Leda and the Swan, I came across this recounting of the story written by someone who is as equally nonplussed by this bizarre tale as I am and they also included several images from art history so,  two birds one stone.

June 20, 2011
Leda (Little Miss Queen of Darkness), 2009 acrylic and charcoal on 31.5cm x 48cm 65lb paper.
 

In Greek mythology, Leda (Λήδα) was daughter of the Aetolian king Thestius, and wife of the king Tyndareus (Τυνδάρεως), of Sparta. Her myth gave rise to the popular motif in Renaissance and later art of Leda and the Swan. She was the mother of Helen (Ἑλένη) of Troy, Clytemnestra (Κλυταιμνήστρα), and Castor and Pollux (Κάστωρ & Πολυδεύκης, spelled Kastor and Polydeuces).

Leda (Little Miss Queen of Darkness), 2009 acrylic and charcoal on 31.5cm x 48cm 65lb paper.

In Greek mythology, Leda (Λήδα) was daughter of the Aetolian king Thestius, and wife of the king Tyndareus (Τυνδάρεως), of Sparta. Her myth gave rise to the popular motif in Renaissance and later art of Leda and the Swan. She was the mother of Helen (Ἑλένη) of Troy, Clytemnestra (Κλυταιμνήστρα), and Castor and Pollux (Κάστωρ & Πολυδεύκης, spelled Kastor and Polydeuces).

June 8, 2011
East Bay Chargers, 2011 31.5cm x 48cm acrylic and charcoal on chipboard

East Bay Chargers, 2011 31.5cm x 48cm acrylic and charcoal on chipboard

May 30, 2011
Everyone Is Afraid of Falling Backwards, 2009
This 61cm x 101cm acrylic and charcoal piece on 75lb paper was done two weeks before The Great Layoff Wave of 2009 swept through the advertising agency where I was employed at the time. Humans are born with two fears: the fear of falling and the fear of loud noises. All other fears are acquired.

Everyone Is Afraid of Falling Backwards, 2009

This 61cm x 101cm acrylic and charcoal piece on 75lb paper was done two weeks before The Great Layoff Wave of 2009 swept through the advertising agency where I was employed at the time. Humans are born with two fears: the fear of falling and the fear of loud noises. All other fears are acquired.

May 27, 2011
I’m Excited…About You And This Opportunity, 2009  61cm x 101cm  acrylic on 75lb paper

I’m Excited…About You And This Opportunity, 2009 61cm x 101cm acrylic on 75lb paper