February 27, 2013
The Opportunistic Omnivore, 2012  acrylic and charcoal on 48cm x 31.5 cm  70lb paper


(Wild hogs), using their extra-long snouts, flattened and strengthened on the end by a plate of cartilage, they can root as deep as three feet. They’ll devour or destroy whole fields—of sorghum, rice, wheat, soybeans, potatoes, melons and other fruits, nuts, grass and hay. Farmers planting corn have discovered that the hogs go methodically down the rows during the night, extracting seeds one by one.
Hogs erode the soil and muddy streams and other water sources, possibly causing fish kills. They disrupt native vegetation and make it easier for invasive plants to take hold. The hogs claim any food set out for livestock, and occasionally eat the livestock as well, especially lambs, kids and calves. They also eat such wildlife as deer and quail and feast on the eggs of endangered sea turtles.
Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/A-Plague-of-Pigs-in-Texas.html#ixzz2M9qnBAJc

The Opportunistic Omnivore, 2012  acrylic and charcoal on 48cm x 31.5 cm  70lb paper

(Wild hogs), using their extra-long snouts, flattened and strengthened on the end by a plate of cartilage, they can root as deep as three feet. They’ll devour or destroy whole fields—of sorghum, rice, wheat, soybeans, potatoes, melons and other fruits, nuts, grass and hay. Farmers planting corn have discovered that the hogs go methodically down the rows during the night, extracting seeds one by one.

Hogs erode the soil and muddy streams and other water sources, possibly causing fish kills. They disrupt native vegetation and make it easier for invasive plants to take hold. The hogs claim any food set out for livestock, and occasionally eat the livestock as well, especially lambs, kids and calves. They also eat such wildlife as deer and quail and feast on the eggs of endangered sea turtles.


Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/A-Plague-of-Pigs-in-Texas.html#ixzz2M9qnBAJc

February 5, 2013
This is Lisa. She’s an ebullient, supportive and creative young woman. I’d also classify her as a lil’ bit of a hippie and very much a successful artist . By that I mean, she’s been committed to her art for the almost 20 years I’ve known her (a true pioneer on the jewelry front) and making a living from it. It was through Lisa’s studio and her brokering, that I liquidated one of my largest and most absurd paintings during a particularly rough financial patch for me, some years ago…for that I am eternally grateful. Last spring she and her man copped a couple of my rabbit pieces for themselves. Here Lisa is pictured with  I’ll See You Hang for This (v7), 2012. I’d also like to congratulate Lisa and Mungu. Earlier today, the two announced that they have created and will soon be bringing forth a new soul from the ether.  #rabbitsasfertilitysymbols 

This is Lisa. She’s an ebullient, supportive and creative young woman. I’d also classify her as a lil’ bit of a hippie and very much a successful artist . By that I mean, she’s been committed to her art for the almost 20 years I’ve known her (a true pioneer on the jewelry front) and making a living from it. It was through Lisa’s studio and her brokering, that I liquidated one of my largest and most absurd paintings during a particularly rough financial patch for me, some years ago…for that I am eternally grateful. Last spring she and her man copped a couple of my rabbit pieces for themselves. Here Lisa is pictured with  I’ll See You Hang for This (v7), 2012. I’d also like to congratulate Lisa and Mungu. Earlier today, the two announced that they have created and will soon be bringing forth a new soul from the ether.  #rabbitsasfertilitysymbols 

January 30, 2013
Orange Flowers in A Jar,  2012 acrylic on 50cm x 61cm canvas

Orange Flowers in A Jar,  2012 acrylic on 50cm x 61cm canvas

January 28, 2013
This is Mungu. He’s a truly down to earth cool cat. I don’t know him as well as I should, but enough… he is the LTR of one of my old time lady bros and I have enjoyed every exchange I’ve had with him, so I know him to be solid. He and his lady acquired Turn Me On (You Fucker) v3 and a version of I’ll See You Hang for This (TBP) last spring. It was a rainy day and they have since moved from the location pictured.

This is Mungu. He’s a truly down to earth cool cat. I don’t know him as well as I should, but enough… he is the LTR of one of my old time lady bros and I have enjoyed every exchange I’ve had with him, so I know him to be solid.
He and his lady acquired Turn Me On (You Fucker) v3 and a version of I’ll See You Hang for This (TBP) last spring. It was a rainy day and they have since moved from the location pictured.

January 28, 2013
This is Darin. He’s an epicurean, a good food maker (something beyond my grasp and something I hold in high regard) and more importantly a talented photographer/documentarian of his culinary manifestations. Darin has also  been a long time supporter of my work. Last spring he acquired Study for Patricia Hearst Mugshot, 2011              

This is Darin. He’s an epicurean, a good food maker (something beyond my grasp and something I hold in high regard) and more importantly a talented photographer/documentarian of his culinary manifestations. Darin has also  been a long time supporter of my work. Last spring he acquired Study for Patricia Hearst Mugshot, 2011              

December 11, 2012
It’s Mythology…It Deals in Extremes,  2012    96cm x 63.5cm acrylic on 90lbs paper

In medieval Europe, the pelican was thought to be particularly attentive to her young, to the point of providing her own blood by wounding her own breast when no other food was available. As a result, the pelican came to symbolise the Passion of Jesus and the Eucharist, and usurped the image of the lamb and the flag. A reference to this mythical characteristic is contained for example in the hymn by Saint Thomas Aquinas, “Adoro te devote” or “Humbly We Adore Thee”, where in the penultimate verse he describes Christ as the “loving divine pelican, able to provide nourishment from his breast”. Elizabeth I of England adopted the symbol, portraying herself as the “mother of the Church of England”.

Meanwhile in the secular realm, pelicans usually lay three eggs but only raise one nestling or chick due to sibling competition or siblicide. The first and second chick to hatch team up to kill the last to hatch. Once done the remaining two battle it out for supremacy, Highlander-style,  because “in end there can only be one.”

It’s Mythology…It Deals in Extremes,  2012    96cm x 63.5cm acrylic on 90lbs paper

In medieval Europe, the pelican was thought to be particularly attentive to her young, to the point of providing her own blood by wounding her own breast when no other food was available. As a result, the pelican came to symbolise the Passion of Jesus and the Eucharist, and usurped the image of the lamb and the flag. A reference to this mythical characteristic is contained for example in the hymn by Saint Thomas Aquinas, “Adoro te devote” or “Humbly We Adore Thee”, where in the penultimate verse he describes Christ as the “loving divine pelican, able to provide nourishment from his breast”. Elizabeth I of England adopted the symbol, portraying herself as the “mother of the Church of England”.

Meanwhile in the secular realm, pelicans usually lay three eggs but only raise one nestling or chick due to sibling competition or siblicide. The first and second chick to hatch team up to kill the last to hatch. Once done the remaining two battle it out for supremacy, Highlander-style,  because “in end there can only be one.”

December 8, 2012
The Lotka-Volterra Equation, 2012 96cm x 63.5cm acrylic on 90lbs paper
In many cultures, the fox appears in folklore as a symbol of cunning and trickery, or as a familiar animal possessed of magic powers.

The Lotka-Volterra Equation, 2012 96cm x 63.5cm acrylic on 90lbs paper

In many cultures, the fox appears in folklore as a symbol of cunning and trickery, or as a familiar animal possessed of magic powers.

September 5, 2012
Wild Hyacinth (Camassia Scilloides), 2012    61cm x 101cm acrylic on 75lb paper
Greek mythology describes the origin of the Hyacinth comme ça: Two gods, Apollo and Zephyr, adored a handsome young Greek man called Hyakinthos. One day the sun god, Apollo,  was teaching Hyakinthos the art of throwing a discus. Zephyr, the god of the west wind, was overcome with jealousy and he blew the discus back. It struck Hyakinthos on the head and killed him. From his blood grew a flower, Apollo named after him. Hyacinths have come to symbolize sport, play and constancy.  -_-

Wild Hyacinth (Camassia Scilloides), 2012    61cm x 101cm acrylic on 75lb paper

Greek mythology describes the origin of the Hyacinth comme ça: Two gods, Apollo and Zephyr, adored a handsome young Greek man called Hyakinthos. One day the sun god, Apollo,  was teaching Hyakinthos the art of throwing a discus. Zephyr, the god of the west wind, was overcome with jealousy and he blew the discus back. It struck Hyakinthos on the head and killed him. From his blood grew a flower, Apollo named after him. Hyacinths have come to symbolize sport, play and constancy.  -_-

August 10, 2012
Radical Feminist Themes (Tacos), 2012  58.5cmx55cm charcoal and acrylic on 95lbs paper
The second in the Radical Feminist Themes series.

Radical Feminist Themes (Tacos), 2012  58.5cmx55cm charcoal and acrylic on 95lbs paper

The second in the Radical Feminist Themes series.

August 8, 2012
Radical Feminist Themes (Nachos),   2012 66cm x 49.5cm acrylic and charcoal on 90lbs paper
 A few years ago I did some storyboarding work on a how-to project regarding dating. One of the boards dealt with food items not to eat on a first date. Other than the couple suggestions about not eating things for ethical reasons, most of the suggestions about what to avoid, concerned items that can be messy/difficult to eat and/or result in embarrassment, including items which would leave one malodorous. While some of the advice on the project appeared to be unisex, unless it was about shaving with a old fashioned straight-blade or how to do a guitar spin, the whole deal seemed targeted at the ladies (broads). Surely I am correct because, in my sexist opinion, gentlemen (bros) are in the minority when it comes to paying for dating advice.

Radical Feminist Themes (Nachos),   2012 66cm x 49.5cm acrylic and charcoal on 90lbs paper

 A few years ago I did some storyboarding work on a how-to project regarding dating. One of the boards dealt with food items not to eat on a first date. Other than the couple suggestions about not eating things for ethical reasons, most of the suggestions about what to avoid, concerned items that can be messy/difficult to eat and/or result in embarrassment, including items which would leave one malodorous. While some of the advice on the project appeared to be unisex, unless it was about shaving with a old fashioned straight-blade or how to do a guitar spin, the whole deal seemed targeted at the ladies (broads). Surely I am correct because, in my sexist opinion, gentlemen (bros) are in the minority when it comes to paying for dating advice.